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Posts for category: Women's Health Care

By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
July 01, 2020
Tags: STD Test  
STDThe American Sexual Health Association reports that one in two sexually active Americans will contract an STD by the time they turn 25 years old. It’s crucial for people to understand the importance of getting an STD test, as well as understand how often they should get tested. If you are a sexually active woman who has never been tested before or has questions about STD testing your OB-GYN is the perfect person to talk to.

Here’s when you should get an STD test,

You are noticing symptoms
This might seem like the most obvious reason to get an STD test but it’s still important to acknowledge. If you notice any symptoms of an STD including any bumps or sores on the genitals, changes in discharge or other changes in your body then you should see your gynecologist as soon as possible to discuss your symptoms and to see if you should get tested.

You have a new partner
Before becoming sexually active with a new partner it’s a good idea to know both of your sexual health statuses. That’s why your OBGYN will always recommend getting an STD test before starting a new sexual relationship. There is nothing better than knowing that both you and your new partner are healthy and STD-free.

You aren’t practicing safe sex
While birth control pills can certainly protect against unwanted pregnancies, most forms of hormonal contraception will not protect against STDs. This is why you will still want to use a condom every time you have sex. If you aren’t practicing safe sex then you should get tested twice a year (or, at the very least, once a year).

You have multiple partners
If you or your partner have other sexual partners, it’s a good idea for both of you to get regular STD tests about every 3-6 months. There is a window period between getting the infection and when the results will appear on an STD test so it’s also important not to test too early. Here’s a great resource to show you when symptoms may appear and when to get tested for what STDs.

It’s a good rule of thumb to get tested at least once a year since many STDs do not produce any symptoms at all, so you could have an STD and not even know it. If you need to schedule an STD test, your OBGYN can often provide you with comprehensive testing right here in their very own office. This is a great option for many women because they have already established a rapport with their doctor and may feel more comfortable undergoing a more sensitive procedure such as an STD screening with a gynecologist they know and trust. Knowing your health status doesn’t just protect you, it also protects your partner.
By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
May 01, 2020
Urinary IncontinenceUrinary incontinence happens when an individual can’t fully control their bladder, resulting in them experiencing leakage. Most women have experienced weakened bladder control at some point in their life. It’s especially common during pregnancy and for a while after. But when do a few accidents indicate a problem? An Obstetrician-Gynecologist (OBGYN) can help with all matters related to women’s sexual and reproductive health. Schedule an appointment with your OBGYN if urinary incontinence starts happening frequently or affects your quality of life. 
 
Before Your Appointment
 
First, don’t be embarrassed about discussing this with your OBGYN. They are a medical professional designed to help you. There are also a few ways to be prepared for your appointment. Try to keep track or write down every instance of urinary incontinence. Record the amount, time of day, frequency, and what you were doing at the time. 
 
Types of Incontinence
 
There are two main types of incontinence that a patient can experience: stress and urge. Stress incontinence happens when pressure is placed on the bladder, forcing leakage. This can happen from any sort of muscular contraction, like sneezing or laughing. Urge incontinence is an overactive bladder. A patient may constantly feel like they need to go to the bathroom. This makes it hard to determine when they do need to go or not, causing accidents to happen.
 
Other causes of urinary continence are also a possibility. Certain foods, drinks, and medications can temporarily affect bladder control. These are known as diuretics, and affect how much urine your body produces. 
 
Common diuretics:
  • Caffeine
  • Carbonated drinks
  • Alcohol
  • Artificial Sweeteners
  • Spicy, sugary, or acidic foods
  • Chili peppers
  • Chocolate
  • Blood pressure and heart medications
  • Muscle relaxants and sedatives
You should also talk to your OBGYN about the possibility of overflow or functional incontinence. Overflow is caused by blockage of the urethra or poor bladder contraction. Functional incontinence is the result of other medical conditions that make going to the bathroom difficult. 
 
Treating Urinary Incontinence
 
Talk to your OBGYN about a treatment that is right for you. There are many possibilities and combinations to try. Many women find success through retraining their bladders, using certain medications, or possibly surgical intervention. 
By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
April 15, 2020
Tags: obstetrician  

Know when to schedule your first appointment with an OBGYN.

Whether you think you might be pregnant or you already received a positive at-home test result, not only do you want to confirm that you have a new bundle of joy on the way but also that you and the baby are getting the proper care from the very beginning.Doctor Appointment

When should I schedule my first prenatal visit?

As soon as you find out that you are pregnant it is important that you schedule an appointment with an OBGYN. In most cases, your first prenatal appointment will happen at around 8 weeks. If you have certain health conditions or are experiencing any symptoms such as vaginal bleeding or abdominal discomfort then you may come in sooner. Even if this isn’t your first pregnancy you should still come in for regular prenatal appointments.

The first prenatal appointment is one of the most important visits and so it can often take longer. This is a time for us to sit down with you and get to know you better. Think of the first appointment as establishing rapport with our OBGYN team. After all, we will be with you throughout your pregnancy so we want you to be comfortable and happy with the care you are receiving.

What will happen during my first appointment?

We will need to go through your detailed medical history, which can include everything from any gynecological issues you might have to drug allergies, chronic health problems, or medications you are currently taking. We will also need to discuss any habits that could affect your pregnancy such as smoking or drinking.

We will also talk to you about the different genetic tests available to you throughout the course of your pregnancy. These tests can be a great way to screen for certain birth defects or genetic disorders like Down syndrome. We will discuss in detail the screenings tests that you can choose to have.

A physical and pelvic exam will also be performed during your first visit. We will also need to take a sample of blood to test for any undiagnosed health conditions or STDS. A urinary sample will also be taken to check for urinary tract infections (UTIs) or other issues.

Of course, during this appointment and any subsequent visits you have, we want you to know that if you have any questions or concerns that you shouldn’t hesitate to ask us. We can provide you with tips, advice, and support throughout this exciting and whirlwind time in your life to make sure that your pregnancy goes as smoothly as possible.

Your obstetrician is here to provide you with the care, treatment and education you need to help navigate your pregnancy. We provide comprehensive maternal fetal medicine to ensure that you and your baby get the care you both deserve during this exciting time.

By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
April 01, 2020
Tags: Irregular Bleeding  

Your OBGYN treats a number of common gynecological conditions, including irregular vaginal bleeding. It’s a concern that can be related to anything from stress, chronic conditions, or reproductive problems. Learn the common causes of irregular bleeding in gynecology, and how you can get your menstrual cycle back to normal. 

Irregular Vaginal Bleeding

In their reproductive years, women menstruate about every 28 days as the uterine lining sheds itself. The bleeding is often moderate to heavy during the first couple of days, then tapers off during the next few days. A normal menstrual cycle lasts up to a week. If the process does not repeat every 28 days or so, or a cycle is missed, or the flow of blood is too heavy or too light, that is considered irregular bleeding. Additional symptoms may include poor mood, problems sleeping, and sharp abdominal pains.

Possible Causes

You should talk to your OBGYN if your menstrual cycle starts to change or becomes irregular. Irregular bleeding can be caused by one or more of the following factors:

  • Certain medications (including birth control pills).

  • Endometriosis (tissue that’s supposed to be inside of the uterus grows on the outside).

  • Stress and lifestyle.

  • Blood clotting disorders.

  • Polycystic ovary syndrome (a hormonal problem).

  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (an infection usually caused by an STD).

  • Uterine fibroids (benign growths in the uterus).

  • Cervical or uterine cancer.

  • Chronic medical conditions (not necessarily related to the reproductive system).

Treatments for Irregular Bleeding

In some cases, irregular bleeding resolves on its own. For instance, if the irregularity is related to stress, de-stressing activities may help, like light exercise, dietary changes, or bed rest. If the problem is your birth control, your gynecologist will discuss other birth control options. If it’s related to another gynecological condition, the treatment may require an ultrasound and further testing. In more serious cases, surgery may be necessary.

See Your OBGYN

Schedule a visit to your OBGYN if you’re experiencing irregular bleeding. It could an easily treatable issue that your gynecologist can resolve with medications or a minor procedure.

By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
April 29, 2019
Tags: Endometriosis  

Endometriosis is a female condition in which tissue that's similar to uterine lining begins growing on the outside of the uterus, often affecting the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and pelvic tissue. During your cycle, the endometrial tissue then becomes thicker until it breaks down and bleeds, and due to how this tissue can’t be removed from the body, it gets trapped. Over time, this can lead to scar tissue (known as adhesions) on the reproductive organs.

This condition affects as many as 11 percent of US woman between the ages of 15 and 44, most often affecting women in their 30s and 40s. This condition can also make it more challenging for women to get pregnant.

What are the symptoms of endometriosis?

The classic symptom of endometriosis is abdominal pain that is usually worse during your menstrual cycle. While a lot of women complain of some abdominal discomfort during menstruation, women with endometriosis often complain of very painful periods, which may even radiate to the lower back.

Women with endometriosis may also experience very heavy periods or breakthrough bleeding (bleeding between cycles). You may also notice pelvic pain during sex or with bowel movements, as well as bloating, constipation, diarrhea, nausea, or fatigue.

All symptoms will vary from woman to woman. For instance, some women may have very severe symptoms but only have milder cases of endometriosis, while those with more severe cases may experience little-to-no-discomfort. Everyone is different; however, if you are experiencing new, persistent, or worsening pelvic pain, it’s important that you talk with your gynecologist.

If you are trying to conceive you may also find it more difficult to do so. Sometimes women don’t often find out that they have endometriosis until they visit their OBGYN to discuss problems getting pregnant.

How is endometriosis diagnosed?

During your evaluation, your OBGYN will ask you questions about the symptoms that you are experiencing. From there, a couple of tests will be performed in order to pinpoint specific signs and symptoms of endometriosis. These tests include a traditional pelvic exam or an ultrasound. In some instances, an MRI exam or a laparoscopy (a minor surgical procedure that allows a doctor to examine the inside of the abdomen and uterus) may be recommended to make a definitive diagnosis.

How is this condition treated?

Since there is no cure for endometriosis the goal of treatment is to manage your symptoms. As with most conditions, we will recommend more conservative treatment options at first to see if they are effective. Common treatment options include,

  • Pain medications (either over-the-counter or prescription-strength)
  • Hormone therapy (e.g. birth control pills; progestin therapy)
  • Fertility treatment (for women who are having trouble conceiving)
  • Laparoscopic surgery to remove excess endometrial tissue

If you are experiencing symptoms of endometriosis, it’s important that you talk to a gynecologist as soon as possible.