My Blog

Posts for category: Pregnancy Care

By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
May 11, 2021
Category: Pregnancy Care
Pregnancy MilestonesIt might feel like those nine months are a blur of excitement, rollercoaster emotions, and planning, but each new milestone and development can be exciting for soon-to-be parents. During your pregnancy, your OBGYN will become an integral part of your pregnancy, providing you with routine exams and checkups, and making sure you and your unborn child stay healthy throughout your pregnancy and delivery. Here are just some of the top pregnancy milestones,
 
Morning Sickness

Yeah, this isn’t going to be the highlight for most women during their pregnancy but it’s certainly a milestone that you won’t forget. These waves of nausea typically occur around the sixth week and, despite the name, can pop up any time of the day or night. The good news is that the queasy stomach and vomiting should go away by about 14 weeks. Talk with your OBGYN if you’re dealing with severe morning sickness or morning sickness that lasts past the first trimester.
 
First Ultrasound

Whether you suspect that you might be pregnant, or you have already gotten a positive pregnancy test, it’s important to schedule an appointment with your OBGYN as soon as possible. The first prenatal visit will usually occur around your sixth week. The first appointment will involve a variety of tests, including blood and urine testing and a Pap smear. You may also get to see your baby for the first time with an ultrasound, depending on how far along you are. This is an unforgettable moment for parents-to-be.
 
Telling Everyone

We know just how important it is to get beyond the three-month mark! Since most miscarriages happen during the first trimester, making it to the second trimester can be a triumph. Not to mention the fact that this is also the time many couples start to share the good news. From social media announcements to telling family and friends in person, this can be an exciting time for couples.
 
First Kick

Feeling your baby kick for the first time can send your heart into a flutter. It will probably be one of the weirdest and most wonderful sensations ever. You may even see an arm or leg sticking out as the baby continues to move around and grow.
 
Your Due Date

While your OBGYN probably gave you an expected due date during your first visit, don’t hold on to that due date too much. Most women don’t have their babies right on that date. While it’s fun to countdown, remember that you may have to wait a week or two more before your baby makes its appearance.
 
The Delivery

You are about to meet your child, so it’s natural to feel a flutter of excitement and nerves as you prepare for childbirth and delivery. At this point, you and your doctor will have made a birth plan to discuss how you ideally want your delivery to go and how to manage your pain. Congratulations, momma; you did it!
 
From answering questions regarding your pregnancy to providing you with checkups and genetic testing, an OBGYN is the doctor you should turn to with regards to your pregnancy health and care.
By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
January 28, 2021
Category: Pregnancy Care
Bleeding During Your PregnancyA Google search will show you thousands upon thousands of women who are wondering whether bleeding is okay during pregnancy. We understand that bleeding can be scary, especially if you aren’t sure what’s causing it. Here’s what you should know about bleeding, including when to turn to an OBGYN.

Bleeding During Your First Trimester

Your body is going through a ton of changes, especially during the first trimester. So it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise that as many as 30 percent of women experience some sort of spotting or light bleeding during early pregnancy. Some of the causes of light bleeding or spotting include,

Implantation bleeding: After about 6 to 12 days after conception, some women experience cramping and light spotting. This is known as implantation bleeding. While some women may assume that their period is coming (since implantation bleeding usually appears a few days before a woman’s period), implantation bleeding is very light and may cause pink or brown spotting that may only last a day or two.
Cervical polyps: These (often) benign polyps are common in women and can lead to inflammation and spots of bright red blood. You may not experience any other symptoms apart from light bleeding, but your OBGYN can diagnose polyps during a pelvic exam.
Pelvic exams, intercourse, or infection: Anything that may irritate the cervix may result in bleeding. This includes infections, intercourse, or a pelvic exam. If you notice some drops of bright red blood after intercourse or a pelvic exam, don’t worry. It will go away on its own.

Bleeding During Second and Third Trimester

While light bleeding is fairly normal during the first trimester, it’s less common and more likely to be a concern if there is bleeding in the second or third trimester. If you are bleeding during your second or third trimester it’s best to talk with your OBGYN as it could be a sign of,
  • Placental abruption
  • Problems with the cervix such as an infection
  • Placenta previa
  • Premature labor
Bleeding: When to be Concerned

Since bleeding could be a sign of a miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, or other serious problems, you must talk with your OBGYN about any bleeding you experience. You should call your doctor right away if,
  • Your bleeding lasts more than 24 hours
  • Bleeding is heavy or you pass blood clots or tissue
  • Your bleeding is accompanied by abdominal pain, fevers, or chills
If you have any concerns about symptoms or issues during pregnancy, your OBGYN can provide you with the answers and care you need. Don’t ever hesitate to call your OBGYN if you are worried about bleeding or other problems. A simple phone call can determine whether you need to come in for an evaluation.
By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
October 20, 2020
Category: Pregnancy Care
PregnancyFinding out you are pregnant is one of the most exciting moments in a woman's or couples’ lives; however, finding out you’re a high-risk pregnancy can be worrisome. It’s important to understand what factors can put a pregnant woman at risk for complications. Some of these factors require simple lifestyle changes while other factors cannot be altered, but the most important factor is that you have a trusted and knowledgeable OBGYN that can ensure that you get the regular prenatal care that you need to prevent serious complications.

What can lead to a high-risk pregnancy?

There is a wide range of factors that can determine whether a woman will be a high-risk pregnancy. Some of these factors include:
  • Previous pregnancy complications (if you’ve been pregnant before and dealt with complications such as premature birth, then you are more likely to deal with complications with future pregnancies)
  • Multiple births (if you are having twins, triplets, quadruplets or more, you are also more likely to go into preterm labor)
  • Hypertension
  • Blood disorders (e.g. sickle cell disease)
  • Lupus or other autoimmune disorders
  • Depression
  • Advanced mature age (women who are age 35 or older)
  • Diabetes (both type 1 and type 2)
  • Thyroid disease
  • HIV/AIDS
Other risk factors include lifestyle habits, such as:
  • Smoking
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Illicit drug use
It’s important to make these changes to your lifestyle before getting pregnant to reduce the risk of birth defects and premature birth.

What does this mean for my care?

Women need to keep in mind that just because they are a high-risk pregnancy does not mean that they will face complications or issues. Having an OBGYN by your side is paramount to keeping both you and baby healthy and making sure that if problems do arise that they are caught and treated early.

A woman who is a high-risk pregnancy will want to visit their OBGYN more often for prenatal checkups so that their doctor can closely monitor them for any changes. Remember, keeping up with your prenatal care appointments is one surefire way to keep both you and your baby safe and healthy.

If you are a high-risk pregnancy or are concerned about being a high-risk pregnancy, it’s important to discuss this with your OBGYN right away.
By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
July 17, 2020
Category: Pregnancy Care
Tags: prenatal care  
Prenatal CareCongratulations! You just found out you are expecting. This is such an exciting time in a woman’s life. Of course, one of the most important things you can do for yourself and your child is to make sure that you are getting prenatal care from a qualified OBGYN throughout your pregnancy. Here’s what you should know about prenatal care and why it’s important for all mothers-to-be.

Why Moms Need Prenatal Care
Once you suspect you are pregnant or get a positive pregnancy test you should schedule your first prenatal visit with your OBGYN. These visits are incredibly important no matter how healthy a mom is. That's because these routine checkups allow our medical team to monitor the development of your unborn child, along with detecting health problems in you or your baby early on. This gives us the chance to treat the problem right away. Women who don’t get prenatal care are seven times more likely to deliver a premature baby. It doesn’t matter whether this is your first or fourth child, these prenatal checkups are for all expectant mothers.

Your Prenatal Care
The first prenatal visit is essential as it confirms the pregnancy. Depending on how far along you are in your pregnancy this may also be baby’s first ultrasound, which will allow your OBGYN to be able to check the health and development of the fetus, as well as provide you with a projected due date. This first checkup is incredibly important as you and your doctor will discuss different lifestyle changes that you will need to make to your home, diet, exercise routine, and more. If you have any questions about do’s and don’ts during pregnancy, these prenatal care checkups are the perfect time to ask.

You will visit your OBGYN about once a month from weeks 4 through 28. Once you reach week 28, you will visit the doctor biweekly until week 36. Once you reach week 36 and until birth you will visit your doctor weekly. Women who are over 35 years old or have a high-risk pregnancy should see the doctor more often.

Along with monitoring you and your baby’s health, certain tests are performed throughout your pregnancy to check for everything from diabetes and anemia to STIs and certain genetic tests. Following a schedule is incredibly important for you and your baby throughout your pregnancy.

Whether you suspect that you might be pregnant, or you have questions about the prenatal services we offer, don’t hesitate to call our OBGYN practice to schedule an appointment. 
By Williams Ob/Gyn & Associates
June 01, 2020
Category: Pregnancy Care
Tags: USDA’s MyPlate  
Congratulations on your little bundle of joy! Pregnancy is a new and exciting time. Your body goes through vast changes as your baby develops. It’s important to do everything possible to guarantee a healthy baby. This includes changing your diet! Many women aren’t sure what they should and shouldn’t eat during this time. Why not schedule an appointment with your local OBGYN and learn what’s best for you?
 
A Balanced Diet and You
You should start eating a balanced diet right away when you find out you are expecting. Most OBGYN’s even recommend starting before you’re even pregnant. What you eat directly affects the baby’s nutrition. Eating healthy foods keeps both of your bodies strong. It’s also a good idea to take a prenatal vitamin or multivitamin with folic acid every day. 
 
Follow your OBGYN’s advice on the proper balance of dairy, proteins, vegetables, fruit, grains, and fats during your pregnancy. A great resource is the USDA’s “MyPlate.” This is the upgraded version of the food pyramid. 
 
Healthy Weight Gain
Everyone is different when it comes to pregnancy. Your OBGYN will monitor your weight gain to make sure it’s within healthy levels. Typically, women gain 2-4 pounds during the first trimester and 3-4 each month during the second and third trimester. 
 
Although you are eating for two, your calorie intake should only increase by about 300 or so. This amount varies between women, so talk to your doctor about an appropriate goal. It’s even more important in the first trimester because of morning sickness. Nausea can make it hard to keep food and fluids down. 
 
Dangerous Foods During Pregnancy
You should avoid certain types of food throughout your pregnancy. These are dangerous for you and the baby. Avoid eating or drinking: 
  • Smoked seafood
  • Hot dogs or deli meat
  • Meat spreads
  • Uncooked sprouts
  • Unpasteurized milk or juice
  • Fish that contain high levels of mercury
It’s also a good idea to reduce your intake of fat and cholesterol. You should also make sure you’re not drinking alcohol, smoking, or consuming high levels of caffeine. 
 
Pregnancy Cravings
Many women crave specific foods during their pregnancies. Just try to make sure what you’re eating ends up being healthy and providing nutrients to your body. If you end up craving junk food, try to limit how much you eat.